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Albino Columbian

Arabesque

Snow

Hypo Columbian

Ghost Columbian

Motley

Pastel Columbian

Sunglow

Anery Columbian

Sharp albino

Nicaraguan

Anery Nicaraguan

T+ Mothley Nicaraguan

T+ Nicaraguan

T+ Central

WC Insular

Longicauda

Amarli

Panama

Caulkers Cay

Sonora Desert Boas

Boa Constrictor Sabogae

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Boa constrictor imperator: (Columbian boas)

Columbian Boas are probably the most well known and commonly kept of all the Boa constrictor group. Their popularity has increased dramatically with the introduction and ever-increasing development of new colour and pattern morphs. Columbian boas average 6-9 feet with some females occasionally exceeding this length.


Here are the morphs and locality boas we are currently working with:





Albino:
Simple recessive gene, when bred to a normal, produces normal looking offspring that will be heterozygous for that mutation. The morph that started it all! We are working with the Kahl line albino, he produced the first albino offspring proving this morph to be simple recessive! A beautiful morph that grows into many different shades of pink, orange and yellow. This original line of albinos promises to remain popular for many years to come.



Arabesque:
Is both a strange looking and unique mutation produced in 1989 and proven to be dominant in 1993. It’s distinctive linked dorsal pattern and body freckles along with an unusual but interesting head-marking make the Arabesque a boa morph with an endless capacity for new mutation combos.





Snow:
A double recessive power house mutation and the results of the perfect blending of two of the first and still very popular recessive boa mutations even today. In this case the Kahl line albino and the Type 1 anerythristic boa, Snows can be used to make many other beautiful boa morphs.





Hypomelanistic:
( Salmon Hypo ) is a co-dominant mutation, basically the morph that makes everything look better. Hypomelanism meaning reduced melanin (black pigment), when bred with other morphs such as anerys and albinos can have amazing results such as ghosts and Sunglows.



Ghost:
( Anery Salmon Hypo) This is a perfect combination of the co-dominant Salmon Hypo and the recessive Anerythristic genes. The resulting Ghost morph is one of the most beautiful boa mutations out there, producing a boa that is both Hypomelanistic and Anerythristic at the same time.



Motley Boa:
This is one of the most perfect examples of the co-dominant mutation; motley's have not only an interesting and unique pattern, but an unusual nuance of color as well. Making motley's a favorite platform for some of the most spectacular mutation combos out there. When bred with other morphs such as albinos, anerythristic and hypomelanistic mutations, making Motleys some of the most sought after boas.




Pastel:
The genetics surrounding these boas tend to be a little more complex and seem to be the product of line and/or selective breeding, with varying results. With brighter and cleaner examples being produced with every generation. Pastels play an important part in producing top-notch albinos (corals) and hypos, as well as some of the cleanest looking anerys.



Sunglow:
(Albino Salmon Hypo) This morph is a perfect combination of the co-dominant Salmon Hypo and the recessive Albino genes. The resulting Sunglow morph is one of the most beautiful boa mutations out there, producing a boa that is both Hypomelanistic and Albino at the same time, many more beautiful combos are possible with this mutation.



Anerythristic:
Simple recessive gene, when bred to a normal, produces normal looking offspring that will be heterozygous for that mutation. Type 1, Black, silver & White, this is what characterises an anerythristic basically meaning lacking red pigment. This morph is also simple recessive in its inheritance. Combined with the Albino genes, these make SNOWS and with the hypomelanistic genes, GHOSTS!



Sharp Albino:
Simple recessive gene, when bred to a normal, produces normal looking offspring that will be heterozygous for that mutation. This form of albino is totally different and not compatible with the Kahl line, they generally have more intensive color and bolder markings. They are also noticeably smaller in overall size than their Colombian counterparts, most likely due to their Central BCI lineage and are the forerunners of many exciting new combinations.



Nicaraguan Boas:
(Central American boas)

Nicaraguan Boas are a small species from Central America. These animals attain a smaller size compared to Colombian boas. Adult females usually reach no more than 5-6 feet in length and can be housed in much smaller enclosures.



Anerythristic:
Simple recessive gene, when bred to a normal, produces normal looking offspring that will be heterozygous for that mutation. Type 2, considerably different than Anerythristic Colombian Boas, these Nicaraguans are from a different recessive line. This morph will be a very important ingredient on many future designer Central American Boa projects!


Motley Nicaraguan:
This is another perfect combination of the co-dominant Motley and the recessive T+ Albino genes. The resulting morph is one of the most beautiful boa mutations out there, producing a boa that is both Motley and Caramel Albino at the same time, all this in a Central American boa locality.


T+ Nicaraguan:
(Tyrosine + Albino) This recessive Boa mutation is one of the most beautiful and spectacular of all the Nicaraguan boa morphs. We are lucky to be working with both captive born and WC import lines of these gorgeous boas.


Hypomelanistic:
( Central Salmon Hypo ) is a co-dominant mutation, again the morph that makes everything look better. Hypomelanism simply meaning reduced melanin (black pigment). We are privileged to be working with 2 different lines of Central hypos, we are looking forward to producing even more interesting combos in the near future.


Hypo Central American Boa




T+ Central:
(Tyrosine + Albino) This recessive Boa mutation is one of the most beautiful and spectacular of all the boa morphs. T+ Central boas express the warmer hews of orange and red. Whereas T+ Nicaraguan boas display more suttle tones of caramel and amber.


Insular Boas:
(As of yet unconfirmed WC locality, BCI ssp) Imported in the fall of 2004 this small group of boas consisted of adults and sub-adult animals, from which we selected 2 pairs of the stronger, healthier looking animals. They all had to some extent the typical signs of being wild caught; scars mouth rot and aggression all the basic signs of being totally stressed out. These are small boas; our females are barely 4 1/2 ft in length, with the males weighing in at only 1200 grams. The small adult size they are expressing is most likely do to with their insular origins. Their overall size even after 2 years has basically remained unchanged; they were then and as far as we can tell already adult or sub-adult boas when they arrived. After several months of being quarantined, they settled in nicely and fed well, their body weights increased dramatically but not their overall length. The males are defiantly mature and showing interest in the larger of the 2 females, courtship and breeding followed. Our first litter of F1’s was produced in 2006 consisting of 8 beautiful healthy babies; we parted with 3 of the new baby insulars. Again insular which simply means “ Island “ and kept the other 5. We agree that more study and breeding is required to properly evaluate these boas, who know perhaps they will eventually be identified and named. But until that time we are very happy to be working with these beautiful boas, as they are most certainly part of a completely new bloodline.

 

 



F1 cbb from WC



Boa Constrictor Longicauda:
(Tumbes boa) Boas from Tumbes, Peru, are unique and were described as a new subspecies in 1991 by Price & Russo and recognized as a valid subspecies. The long-tail boa is probably one of the rarest localities of boa in Captivity. This is due to the fact that Ecuador and Peru have had a long time border dispute over the Tumbes area. It is very dangerous to travel to this part of the world and therefore research is impossible. Secondly since this area is under dispute – it is impossible to get permits to collect boas in this area from the local government. It has been noted by Peruvian Herpetologists that the Long-tail boa is rare in its natural habitat. So any available captive bred specimens are always a welcomed event.

 





Boa Constrictor Amarli:
(Short tail boas) Short tail boas originate from both Brazil and Bolivia, animals form both these areas show a level of similarity as far as overall patterns, however their overall colours can vary greatly depending on their origins, with some animals showing characteristics from both localities. The short tail boas we are working with are prime examples of what is referred to as the Barnett Blood line. These boas show a silver grey base colour with varying amount of pink and orange hues. They have a short and stout body structure, very similar to that of a ball or blood python. They are slow growers compared to Columbian boas, and reach an average length 5 feet, with females being somewhat larger.

 




Panama Boas:
(Reverse Striped) Another interesting locality boa, with many individuals having a striped or reversed striped tail pattern and a low saddle count, Panama boas usually average 20 saddles or less from snout to vent which rarely connect to each other. Hypomelanistic animals have also been found to occur in this locality of boas.

 




Caulkers Cay Boa:
Originate form a small island of the coast of Belize, the first Caulkers Cay boas were imported in 1990 and all captive bred animals available today are descendants from these originally imported boas. These are small lean boas that can reach up to 5 feet in length for females with males being much smaller, their background color usually a bluish/grey gives them an anerythristic appearance although they are not true anery boas they retain some reddish pigmentation in the tail area.

 







Sonora Desert Boas:
We are working with both the Marcia Lincoln line of Hypo Sonorans, as well as the recessive Leopard Boa mutation developed by Hans Winner of Germany.











Boa Constrictor Sabogae:
Saboga boas are probably one of the rarest boa constrictor in captivity today. A naturally occurring hypomelanistic dwarf that is known to be semi arboreal. Our boas are descendants of Saboga boas found in the Pearl Island chain. These babies are from some of first breeding in the U.S. Boa's from this island, have a very distinguishable look to them. Many of them lack varying amounts of the typical dorsal pattern, while others show very faded patterns, with some having no dorsal pattern at all!